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Dutch Shepherd (Shorthair)

Which Dogs Belong To The Herding Group Of Dogs? (Part 4) 21

country of origin
Netherlands
default number
223
height at the withers
Dogs: 57-62 cm Bitches: 55-60 cm.
use
herding dog
FCI Group 1
Herding dogs and cattle dogs (except Swiss Mountain Dogs)
Group 1 Sheepdogs and Cattle Dogs (except Swiss Mountain Dogs) Section 1 Shepherd Dogs Without working test

Description: Dutch Shepherd Dog (Dutch Shepherd Dog (Shorthair))

GENERAL APPEARANCE:

The Dutch Shepherd is a medium-sized, medium-weight, well-muscled dog with a strong, well-proportioned build. A dog with a lot of stamina, a lively nature and an intelligent expression. The Dutch Shepherd Dog is divided into the following varieties depending on the coat: short, long and rough coated.

BEHAVIOR/PERSONALITY:

The Dutch Shepherd is very loyal and dependable, always alert, alert, active, independent, with great stamina, intelligent, ready to be obedient and endowed with the traits of a real Shepherd. The Dutch Shepherd likes to work collaboratively with its owner and will independently complete any task that is given to it. When herding larger herds, he must have the ability to work with several other dogs.

History: Dutch Shepherd (Dutch Shepherd (Shorthair))

The main job of the Dutch Shepherd Dog was originally that of a shepherd dog in the countryside. The Dutch had an agricultural culture very early on, which was maintained, among other things, by flocks of sheep. The dogs had to keep the herds away from the fields, which they did by patrolling the borders of roads and fields. They also accompanied the herds on their way to the common meadows, markets and ports.

On the farm they kept chickens out of the kitchen gardens, tended the cows and took them to be milked and pulled the milk carts. They also alerted the farmers to strangers approaching the farm.

Around 1900 there were hardly any herds of sheep left in the Netherlands. The Dutch Shepherd’s flexible abilities made it very suitable for dog training, which was becoming popular at the time. So he started a new career as a police dog, as a search and tracking dog and as a guide dog. Despite this, he is still capable of herding sheep.

The first breed standard is dated June 12, 1898.

Coat: Dutch Shepherd (Dutch Shepherd (Shorthair))

Hair:

Short hair: Quite hard hair with an undercoat that is not too short is desired all over the body. The collar, trousers and feathered tail must be clearly visible.
Long Hair: Long, straight, close-lying, coarse to the touch all over the body, with no curls or waves and with an undercoat. Clear collar and pants.

Tail abundantly hairy all around. The head, ears and paws as well as the hind legs below the hocks are short and densely haired. The backs of the front legs have a heavily developed hair that decreases in length down to the paws, the so-called feathers. No fringes on the ears.

Wire-haired: Dense, hard, bushy hair and dense undercoat all over the body apart from the head. The coat of hair must be tightly closed. The upper and lower lips should have plenty of hair (the so-called mustache and goatee) and two well-developed, shaggy, harsh eyebrows that are prominent but not excessive.

The feathering is not soft. The hair on the skull and cheeks is less developed. Viewed in profile, the head appears square. Strongly developed trousers are desired. The tail is very hairy all around. The brindle color may be a little less obvious due to the tousled hair. The rough hair should be hand stripped twice a year on average.

COLOR :

brindle. The base color is gold or silver. The golden color can vary from light sandy color to chestnut red. The flow is clear all over the body, including the collar, trousers and tail. Too much black is undesirable. A black mask is preferred.

Large white markings on the chest or feet are undesirable.

Dutch Shepherd Dog (longhair)

Which Dogs Belong To The Herding Group Of Dogs? (Part 4) 22

country of origin
Netherlands
default number
223
height at the withers
Dogs: 57-62 cm Bitches: 55-60 cm.
use
herding dog
FCI Group 1
Herding dogs and cattle dogs (except Swiss Mountain Dogs)
Group 1 Sheepdogs and Cattle Dogs (except Swiss Mountain Dogs) Section 1 Shepherd Dogs Without working test

Description: Dutch Shepherd Dog (Dutch Shepherd Dog (long-haired))

GENERAL APPEARANCE:

The Dutch Shepherd is a medium-sized, medium-weight, well-muscled dog with a strong, well-proportioned build. A dog with a lot of stamina, a lively nature and an intelligent expression. The Dutch Shepherd Dog is divided into the following varieties depending on the coat: short, long and rough coated.

BEHAVIOR/PERSONALITY:

The Dutch Shepherd is very loyal and dependable, always alert, alert, active, independent, with great stamina, intelligent, ready to be obedient and endowed with the traits of a real Shepherd. The Dutch Shepherd likes to work collaboratively with its owner and will independently complete any task that is given to it. When herding larger herds, he must have the ability to work with several other dogs.

History: Dutch Shepherd (Dutch Shepherd (longhair))

The main job of the Dutch Shepherd Dog was originally that of a shepherd dog in the countryside. The Dutch had an agricultural culture very early on, which was maintained, among other things, by flocks of sheep. The dogs had to keep the herds away from the fields, which they did by patrolling the borders of roads and fields. They also accompanied the herds on their way to the common meadows, markets and ports.

On the farm they kept chickens out of the kitchen gardens, tended the cows and took them to be milked and pulled the milk carts. They also alerted the farmers to strangers approaching the farm.

Around 1900 there were hardly any herds of sheep left in the Netherlands. The Dutch Shepherd’s flexible abilities made it very suitable for dog training, which was becoming popular at the time. So he started a new career as a police dog, as a search and tracking dog and as a guide dog. Despite this, he is still capable of herding sheep.

The first breed standard is dated June 12, 1898.

Coat: Dutch Shepherd (Dutch Shepherd (Longhair))

Hair:

Short hair: Quite hard hair with an undercoat that is not too short is desired all over the body. The collar, trousers and feathered tail must be clearly visible.
Long Hair: Long, straight, close-lying, coarse to the touch all over the body, with no curls or waves and with an undercoat. Clear collar and pants.

Tail abundantly hairy all around. The head, ears and paws as well as the hind legs below the hocks are short and densely haired. The backs of the front legs have a heavily developed hair that decreases in length down to the paws, the so-called feathers. No fringes on the ears.

Wire-haired: Dense, hard, bushy hair and dense undercoat all over the body apart from the head. The coat of hair must be tightly closed. The upper and lower lips should have plenty of hair (the so-called mustache and goatee) and two well-developed, shaggy, harsh eyebrows that are prominent but not excessive.

The feathering is not soft. The hair on the skull and cheeks is less developed. Viewed in profile, the head appears square. Strongly developed trousers are desired. The tail is very hairy all around. The brindle color may be a little less obvious due to the tousled hair. The rough hair should be hand stripped twice a year on average.

COLOR :

brindle. The base color is gold or silver. The golden color can vary from light sandy color to chestnut red. The flow is clear all over the body, including the collar, trousers and tail. Too much black is undesirable. A black mask is preferred.

Large white markings on chest or feet are undesirable.

Dutch Shepherd (Wire-Haired)

Which Dogs Belong To The Herding Group Of Dogs? (Part 4) 23

country of origin
Netherlands
default number
223
height at the withers
Dogs: 57-62 cm Bitches: 55-60 cm.
use
herding dog
FCI Group 1
Herding dogs and cattle dogs (except Swiss Mountain Dogs)
Group 1 Sheepdogs and Cattle Dogs (except Swiss Mountain Dogs) Section 1 Shepherd Dogs Without working test

Description: Dutch Shepherd Dog (Dutch Shepherd Dog (wire-haired))

GENERAL APPEARANCE:

The Dutch Shepherd is a medium-sized, medium-weight, well-muscled dog with a strong, well-proportioned build. A dog with a lot of stamina, a lively nature and an intelligent expression. The Dutch Shepherd Dog is divided into the following varieties depending on the coat: short, long and rough coated.

BEHAVIOR/PERSONALITY:

The Dutch Shepherd is very loyal and dependable, always alert, alert, active, independent, with great stamina, intelligent, ready to be obedient and endowed with the traits of a real Shepherd. The Dutch Shepherd likes to work collaboratively with its owner and will independently complete any task that is given to it. When herding larger herds, he must have the ability to work with several other dogs.

History: Dutch Shepherd (Dutch Shepherd (wire-haired))

The main job of the Dutch Shepherd Dog was originally that of a shepherd dog in the countryside. The Dutch had an agricultural culture very early on, which was maintained, among other things, by flocks of sheep. The dogs had to keep the herds away from the fields, which they did by patrolling the borders of roads and fields. They also accompanied the herds on their way to the common meadows, markets and ports.

On the farm they kept chickens out of the kitchen gardens, tended the cows and took them to be milked and pulled the milk carts. They also alerted the farmers to strangers approaching the farm.

Around 1900 there were hardly any herds of sheep left in the Netherlands. The Dutch Shepherd’s flexible abilities made it very suitable for dog training, which was becoming popular at the time. So he started a new career as a police dog, as a search and tracking dog and as a guide dog. Despite this, he is still capable of herding sheep.

The first breed standard is dated June 12, 1898.

Coat: Dutch Shepherd (Dutch Shepherd (Wirehaired))

Hair:

Short hair: Quite hard hair with an undercoat that is not too short is desired all over the body. The collar, trousers and feathered tail must be clearly visible.
Long Hair: Long, straight, close-lying, coarse to the touch all over the body, with no curls or waves and with an undercoat. Clear collar and pants.

Tail abundantly hairy all around. The head, ears and paws as well as the hind legs below the hocks are short and densely haired. The backs of the front legs have a heavily developed hair that decreases in length down to the paws, the so-called feathers. No fringes on the ears.

Wire-haired: Dense, hard, bushy hair and dense undercoat all over the body apart from the head. The coat of hair must be tightly closed. The upper and lower lips should have plenty of hair (the so-called mustache and goatee) and two well-developed, shaggy, harsh eyebrows that are prominent but not excessive.

The feathering is not soft. The hair on the skull and cheeks is less developed. Viewed in profile, the head appears square. Strongly developed trousers are desired. The tail is very hairy all around. The brindle color may be a little less obvious due to the tousled hair. The rough hair should be hand stripped twice a year on average.

COLOR :

brindle. The base color is gold or silver. The golden color can vary from light sandy color to chestnut red. The flow is clear all over the body, including the collar, trousers and tail. Too much black is undesirable. A black mask is preferred.

Large white markings on chest or feet are undesirable.

Hrvatski Ovcar

Which Dogs Belong To The Herding Group Of Dogs? (Part 4) 24

country of origin
Croatia
default number
277
height at the withers
40-50cm
use
Although his herding instinct is particularly developed, he can also be used well as a guard dog.
FCI Group 1
Herding dogs and cattle dogs (except Swiss Mountain Dogs)
Section 1 German Shepherds. Without work test.

Description: Hrvatski Ovcar

GENERAL APPEARANCE:

The size of the Croatian Shepherd Dog is on the lower limit of medium-sized dogs. Its basic color is black; short hair on the head and limbs is a characteristic of the breed.

BEHAVIOR/PERSONALITY:

The Hrvatski Ovcar is lively, attentive, frugal and easy to train.

Coat: Hrvatski Ovcar

HAIR:

On the back the hair is 7-14 cm long; the facial part of the head is always covered with short hair; the hair is short on the outside of the ears and longer on the inside; the backs of the forelegs have long hair (fringes) up to the tarsus; the hind limbs are behosted (fringed) up to the hock. The hair is relatively soft, wavy or even curly; it must never be woolly. The undercoat must be bushy.

COLOR:

The basic color is black; certain white markings are permitted; white markings are not allowed on the head, body and tail, but they are allowed under the throat, on and under the breast; white markings on toes or feet are acceptable but undesirable. White boots worsen the form value mark.

Komondor

Which Dogs Belong To The Herding Group Of Dogs? (Part 4) 25

country of origin
Hungary
default number
53
height at the withers
Dogs: at least 70 cm, bitches: at least 65 cm
weight
Males: 50-60 kg, females: 40-50 kg
use
shepherd dog
FCI Group 1
Herding dogs and cattle dogs (except Swiss Mountain Dogs)
Section 1 German Shepherds. Without work test.

Description: Komondor

GENERAL APPEARANCE:

The Komondor is tall and powerfully built. The winning appearance and the dignified posture arouse awe in the observer, possibly also fear. He’s not flattering by nature. The robust body is covered with matted, shaggy, thick, long hair throughout. Seen from the side, the body forms a lying rectangle that deviates slightly from the square. The densely haired head towers over the body. The tail is carried hanging, with the end of the tail bent almost to the horizontal. The coat is ivory colored.

BEHAVIOR/PERSONALITY:

The Komondor shows unwavering bravery in guarding and defending the herd of cattle entrusted to him, his property, and the house of his masters. He attacks silently and boldly. He regards his territory as his own, in which he does not tolerate any foreign creatures. His attitude is suspicious. During the day he likes to lie down so that he can control his area. During the night he is constantly on the move.

History: Komondor

The Komondor is a long-established Hungarian herding breed of Asian origin. Its original ancestors most likely came to the Carpathian Basin with the migratory, nomadic ancient Magyars who lived from cattle breeding.

Coat: Komondor

The whole body is covered with long hair. The coat consists of a coarser top coat and finer undercoat. The character of the coat is determined by the ratio of the top coat to the undercoat. The shaggy coat that tends to become matted is a basic requirement. An equally dense, wavy, tied coat of hair also occurs. The smaller tufts of hair are little or not felty. The length of the coat is longest on the croup, loins and back of the thighs (min. 20-27 cm), medium long (min. 15-22 cm) on the back, sides of the chest and in the area of ​​the shoulder blades Cheeks, eyebrow arches, shorter at head level, ears, neck and limbs (10-18 cm), shortest on lips and lower limbs (9-11 cm). Neither combed nor completely unkempt hair is desired.

Kuvasz

Which Dogs Belong To The Herding Group Of Dogs? (Part 4) 26

country of origin
Hungary
default number
54
height at the withers
Dogs: 71-76 cm, bitches: 66-70 cm
weight
Males: 48-62 kg, females: 37-50 kg
use
The kuvasz is used to guard and protect houses and property and other valuables, as well as people. It was also used for hunting and as a tracking dog.
FCI Group 1
Herding dogs and cattle dogs (except Swiss Mountain Dogs)
Section 1 German Shepherds. Without work test.

Description: Kuvasz

GENERAL APPEARANCE:

The dogs of this breed are strong, tall and have a dense, wavy, white coat. Her pleasing appearance radiates nobility and power. The individual body parts fit together harmoniously and the legs are neither too short nor too long. The bone structure is strong but not coarse. The strong musculature is lean and the joints are sharply defined. Seen from the side, the body forms a lying rectangle close to the square. Well muscled. Strong build, lively temperament, great mobility. His appearance testifies to tireless efficiency.

BEHAVIOR/PERSONALITY:

The Kuvasz is brave and fearless. He defends the persons entrusted to his care or belongings assigned to his protection, even at the risk of his life. He is self-confident, if treated badly he can become aggressive. The Kuvasz is loyal, reliable, loves his master and his environment. He needs a lot of exercise and needs to be kept busy. The Kuvasz is undemanding, it is easy to care for and it tolerates very bad weather conditions well. He shows his gratitude for the love and care shown to him.

History: Kuvasz

It is a long-established ancient Hungarian shepherd dog. His ancestors came to the Carpathian Basin with the Magyar occupation; they needed these dogs to guard and protect their flocks from predators and thieves. Due to his hunting instinct, he was primarily used for hunting at the time of King Matthias Corvinus. Since the decline of pastoralism, its original use has become much rarer, and it has become indigenous to villages and later even cities.

Coat: Kuvasz

Moderately hard, wavy, somewhat stiff, not prone to matting. Under the coarser top coat there is a finer downy undercoat. The head, ears and paws are covered with short, 1 to 2 cm long, dense and straight hair. The front and sides of the forelegs and the hind legs below the knee joints are also covered with short, 1 to 2 cm long, straight hair. On the back of the legs there are feathers that are 5 to 8 cm long and reach down to the hock joint on the hind legs. There is a ruff around the neck, which extends into the chest mane that reaches to the chest. This is particularly expressive in males. On the body, thighs and upper arms, the hair is of moderate length (4 to 12 cm) and is abundantly wavy, often forming crests, ridges and tufts. The tail is covered with thick, wavy hair along its entire length; at the top, the length of the hair can reach even 10-15 cm.

Laekenois

Which Dogs Belong To The Herding Group Of Dogs? (Part 4) 27

country of origin
Belgium
default number
15
height at the withers
Males: 62 cm, females: 58 cm (average measurement; tolerance -2/+4 cm)
weight
Males: 25 – 30 kg, females: 20 – 25 kg
use
Originally a shepherd dog, today a working dog (guard dog, protection dog, tracking dog, etc.) and a multi-purpose service dog as well as a family dog.
FCI Group 1
Herding dogs and cattle dogs (except Swiss Mountain Dogs)
Section 1 German Shepherds. With work test.

Description: Belgian Shepherd Dog (Laekenois)

There are four attractive varieties in the Belgian Shepherd Dog breed: Malinois, Groenendael, Tervueren and Laekenois. Although colors and coats vary, they all share the skills of herding dogs and guard dogs. The Belgian Shepherd Dog is a highly active, productive and willing dog.

The Personality of the Belgian Shepherd Dog

A lively and lively temperament characterizes the personality of the Belgian Shepherd Dog. His posture is proud, his expression always attentive. Fear or aggressiveness are not part of the desired profile of the spirited dog.

Preferences, training and care of the Belgian Shepherd Dog

He is alert and extremely active. The Belgian Shepherd Dog’s innate vivacity predestines it for a highly active life. Of course, the Belgian Shepherd has all the qualities of a herding dog, but it also proves to be a reliable guard dog. He excels as a protection and service dog. The breed seems to be constantly on the move and downright tireless. Circular movements are often observed and an expression of the exuberant temperament. Agility suits the Belgian shepherd just as much as tournament dog sport, eventing, rescue and tracking work and much more. The breed is extremely docile and easy to train. The maintenance effort is kept within limits for all varieties. Occasional brushing is enough.

This is what the Belgian Shepherd Dog looks like

The length of the hair, the direction of growth and texture of the coat and the coloring are criteria that lead to the distinction of the four varieties of this breed: Groenendael, Tervueren, Malinois and Laekenois. At pedigree dog shows, these four varieties are judged separately. The maximum height at the withers is 62 centimetres.
All of them require thick, close-lying hair with good texture. Together with the undercoat, it envelops the body like a protective coat. Long-haired variants, the Groenendael and the Tervueren, show short hair on the head, on the outsides of the ears and on the lower parts of the limbs. Otherwise the hair is long and straight, abundant around the neck and on the front chest. At the back of the thighs it forms pants. The tail is well covered with hair forming a flag.

Distinct masks are typical of Tervueren and Malinois. Hair ends dyed black create a black cloud. The fawn-black-clouded Malinois is short-haired. The fawn Laekenois is rough-haired. The Groenendael is solid black. The Tervueren is preferably fawn-black-overcast or grey-black-overcast with a black mask.

The Belgian Shepherd’s gait is lively and free. His favorite gaits are walk and trot. The canter is also of very high quality.

The origin of the Belgian Shepherd Dog

The origin of the breed can be dated to between 1891 and 1897. At that time the “Belgian Shepherd Dog Club” was founded and Professor A. Reul, lecturer at the Veterinary School in Cureghem, arranged a meeting to which 117 Belgian Shepherd Dogs were brought. This offered the opportunity to take stock and select the best representatives of the breed. This is considered the beginning of purposeful breeding of this breed. In 1892 there was the first standard that only described one breed – with three different coat varieties. In 1901 the first Belgian shepherd dogs were entered in the stud book of the Société Royale St. Hubert (L.O.S.H.). Around 1910, the type and personality of the Belgian shepherd appeared to be quite stable. However, the discussions about permissible varieties and colors should keep breed lovers busy for a long time to come. In terms of usability, however, there was always agreement.

Lancashire Heeler

Which Dogs Belong To The Herding Group Of Dogs? (Part 4) 28

Heelers have always been used in livestock farming and we find similar type dogs in the Welsh Corgi and Vastgotaspitz.

Only later was the dog breed rebuilt, and it’s still going strong.
The range within the breed is wide and as of 1992 their country of origin had not released registration rights.

Origin:

Great Britain

Life expectancy:
12 to 15 years

Size:
Males: 25-31 cm
Females: 25-31cm

Weight:
Males: 2.7-5.9 kg
Females: 2.7-5.9 kg

Default:

The Lancashire Heeler is a small, low, square and agile dog.

Head:

Normal size with a flat skullcap, wide between the ears.
Moderate stop.
Length of muzzle equals that of skull.
Nose and skullcap parallel.
Dry lips.

Eyes:

Almond-shaped, medium-sized, dark.

Ears:

Slightly hanging or prick ears.

Denture:
scissor bite.

Throat:
Long, arched.

Body:
Long chest, strongly arched, short loins, straight back.

Limbs:
Shoulders well laid back, strong bone structure, forefeet slightly curved outwards.
Well angulated hindquarters, muscular with deep hocks.
Parallel hind legs.

Rod:
Set high, carried in a slight arc down the back.

Movement:
Fast, energetic, and free.

Coat of hair:
Varies from smooth, shiny, and short to long.

Colour:
Black with reddish brown spots, small white chest spots are allowed.

Malinois

Which Dogs Belong To The Herding Group Of Dogs? (Part 4) 29

country of origin
Belgium
default number
15
height at the withers
Males: 62 cm, females: 58 cm (average measurement; tolerance -2/+4 cm)
weight
Males: 25 – 30 kg, females: 20 – 25 kg
use
Originally a shepherd dog, today a working dog (guard dog, protection dog, tracking dog, etc.) and a multi-purpose service dog as well as a family dog.
FCI Group 1
Herding dogs and cattle dogs (except Swiss Mountain Dogs)
Section 1 German Shepherds. With work test.

Description: Belgian Shepherd Dog (Malinois)

There are four attractive varieties in the Belgian Shepherd Dog breed: Malinois, Groenendael, Tervueren and Laekenois. Although colors and coats vary, they all share the skills of herding dogs and guard dogs. The Belgian Shepherd Dog is a highly active, productive and willing dog.

The Personality of the Belgian Shepherd Dog

A lively and lively temperament characterizes the personality of the Belgian Shepherd Dog. His posture is proud, his expression always attentive. Fear or aggressiveness are not part of the desired profile of the spirited dog.

Preferences, training and care of the Belgian Shepherd Dog

He is alert and extremely active. The Belgian Shepherd Dog’s innate vivacity predestines it for a highly active life. Of course, the Belgian Shepherd has all the qualities of a herding dog, but it also proves to be a reliable guard dog. He excels as a protection and service dog. The breed seems to be constantly on the move and downright tireless. Circular movements are often observed and an expression of the exuberant temperament. Agility suits the Belgian shepherd just as much as tournament dog sport, eventing, rescue and tracking work and much more. The breed is extremely docile and easy to train. The maintenance effort is kept within limits for all varieties. Occasional brushing is enough.

This is what the Belgian Shepherd Dog looks like

The length of the hair, the direction of growth and texture of the coat and the coloring are criteria that lead to the distinction of the four varieties of this breed: Groenendael, Tervueren, Malinois and Laekenois. At pedigree dog shows, these four varieties are judged separately. The maximum height at the withers is 62 centimetres.
All of them require thick, close-lying hair with good texture. Together with the undercoat, it envelops the body like a protective coat. Long-haired variants, the Groenendael and the Tervueren, show short hair on the head, on the outsides of the ears and on the lower parts of the limbs. Otherwise the hair is long and straight, abundant around the neck and on the front chest. At the back of the thighs it forms pants. The tail is well covered with hair forming a flag.

Distinct masks are typical of Tervueren and Malinois. Hair ends dyed black create a black cloud. The fawn-black-clouded Malinois is short-haired. The fawn Laekenois is rough-haired. The Groenendael is solid black. The Tervueren is preferably fawn-black-overcast or grey-black-overcast with a black mask.

The Belgian Shepherd’s gait is lively and free. His favorite gaits are walk and trot. The canter is also of very high quality.

The origin of the Belgian Shepherd Dog

The origin of the breed can be dated to between 1891 and 1897. At that time the “Belgian Shepherd Dog Club” was founded and Professor A. Reul, lecturer at the Veterinary School in Cureghem, arranged a meeting to which 117 Belgian Shepherd Dogs were brought. This offered the opportunity to take stock and select the best representatives of the breed. This is considered the beginning of purposeful breeding of this breed. In 1892 there was the first standard that only described one breed – with three different coat varieties. In 1901 the first Belgian shepherd dogs were entered in the stud book of the Société Royale St. Hubert (L.O.S.H.). Around 1910, the type and personality of the Belgian shepherd appeared to be quite stable. However, the discussions about permissible varieties and colors should keep breed lovers busy for a long time to come. In terms of usability, however, there was always agreement.

Majorca Shepherd Dog

Which Dogs Belong To The Herding Group Of Dogs? (Part 4) 30

country of origin
Spain
default number
321
height at the withers
Dogs: 66-73 cm Bitches: 62-68 cm
weight
about 40 kg
use
Herding, guard and protection dog.
FCI Group 1
Herding dogs and cattle dogs (except Swiss Mountain Dogs)
Group 1: Sheepdogs and Cattle Dogs (without Swiss Mountain Dogs) Section 1: Shepherd Dogs Without working test

Description: Ca de Bestiar (Mallorca Shepherd Dog)

Dog of slightly convex profile, large but not exaggerated, and of medium weight. He is all black or black with white chest markings, well proportioned, rustic, strong, muscular, sturdy and agile. There are two types of hair:
– Shorthair, most common variety, and
– Longhair.

BEHAVIOR/PERSONALITY:

Dog of great nobility. The Ca de Bestiar knows only one master and is reluctant to be approached by strangers; intelligent, docile, affectionate; extremely shy and reserved when young, his emotional outbursts reach unimagined proportions; he is faithful to his master unto death; his eyes reveal what he is thinking; he is brave and argumentative.

History: Ca de Bestiar (Mallorca Shepherd Dog)

The Ca de Bestiar (literally translated cattle dog, German breed name: (Mallorca shepherd dog) is the dog of the homesteads and herds of the Balearic Islands. The origin of the breed will probably never be clarified. Due to the island location, imported herd working dogs probably also arose Dog type out, with a wide range of variations, just as it was needed.The cattle herdsmen’s dogs were bigger and stronger than the sheep and goatherds’ dogs, which had to be more agile and smaller in order to be able to follow the goats in the 1930s it was widespread and popular because of its vigilance and reliability. The decline began with the Franco dictatorship. After the Second World War, continental European breeds were also crossed in. The picture changed and the original breed type was in danger of disappearing. It was not until 1967 that one is aware of this A lover of the Ca de Bestiar, Alonso Guasp, set out to save the breed and g founded the Club del Perro de Pastor Mallorquín in 1970. In 1975 the first breed standard was established. He was first seen at a dog show in 1980. Relatively quickly, in 1982, the first official standard was announced when it was recognized by the FCI.

Coat: Ca de Bestiar (Mallorca Sheepdog)

The hair is short, close-lying, about 1.5 to 3 cm long on the back, with a very fine, thin undercoat lying close to the skin. In the long-haired variety, the hair on the back can be slightly wavy and, depending on the season, can reach a little over 7 cm in length; the undercoat is well distributed and not thick, black in varying shades.